The negative aspects of college sports as a business

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The negative aspects of college sports as a business

In his article about collegiate sports programs, Thomas Rosandich refers to a "performance pyramid", which shows the general progression of athletic organizations in the United States.

As the pyramid progresses, the level of competition increases, while the number of competitors decreases until the highest level of organized sport, professional sportsis reached. In many respects, the intercollegiate sports level serves as a feeder system to the professional level, as the elite college athletes are chosen to compete at the next level.

This system differs greatly from nearly all other countries in the world, which generally have government-funded sports organizations that serve as a feeder system for professional competition. As well, in many countries professional clubs recruit athletes as children and develop them in their own academies, rather than through high school sports, signing them to professional contracts before they are done secondary school.

Viewed retrospectively over the past plus years of its history, intercollegiate athletics has moved from mainly providing an avenue for student athletes and fans to enjoy sports participation to predominantly focusing on increases in revenue and institutional prestige that can Revenues and expenses[ edit ] College athletics have a significant economic impact on their schools and local communities.

Universities produce substantial revenue from their intercollegiate athletic programs in ticket and merchandise sales. Only one in eight of the Division I colleges actually netted more money than they spent on athletics between the years and At the few money making schools, football and sometimes basketball sales support the school's other athletic programs.

The amount spent on an athlete in one of the six highest-profile football conferences, on average, is six times more than the amount spent to educate the non-athlete. The law states that: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance The regulations pertaining to athletics require that an institution which sponsors interscholastic, intercollegiate, club or intramural athletics shall provide "equal athletic opportunity" for members of both sexes.

In order to successfully comply with Title IX requirements, NCAA institutions must meet one of the requirements in the "three prong test" as follows: Prong one - Provide athletic participation opportunities that are substantially proportionate to student enrollment.

This part of the test is satisfied when participation opportunities for men and women are "substantially proportionate" to their respective undergraduate enrollment. This part of the test is satisfied when an institution has a history and continuing practice of program expansion that is responsive to the developing interests and abilities of the underrepresented sex typically female.

This part of the test is satisfied when an institution is meeting the interests and abilities of its female students even where there are disproportionately fewer females than males participating in sports. They have the power to pull federal funding from schools or organizations that are found to be non-compliant with title IX, although this power has never been exercised.

The OCR will usually work with the school or organization that is non-compliant to set up a schedule or plan to follow to become compliant.

In its peak, the AIAW had almost 1, member schools. In the early s, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and the National Collegiate Athletic Association began sponsoring intercollegiate championships for women, and the AIAW discontinued operation after the season.

Since its passing, Title IX has allowed for female participation to almost double in college sports. Before the law was passed in fewer than 30, girls participated in college sports; as of more thangirls participated in college sports.

Questions have been raised over the equity between male and female student athletes. Females, regardless of whether an administrator, coach, or athlete, thought there to be less equity than males when it comes to these five factors: In addition, Title IX legislation has affected male athletes as well as male coaches.

Title IX has been associated with the cutting of opportunities available for men and boys. As budgets are stretched to accommodate additional programming requirements for women and girls. More than 2, men's athletic teams have been eliminated since to comply with the proportionality prong of Title IX requirements.

Before Title IX, 90 percent of women's intercollegiate teams were coached by women. Although the actual number of female coaches increased between andthe percentage of female coaches continued to decline over that same period. In addition, although men have broken into coaching female athletes, female coaches have not experienced the same opportunities to coach male athletes.

In99 percent of collegiate men's teams were coached by men, and the same is true today. Increasing female participation in sports has had a direct effect on women's education and employment.The sports world is fixed on the activity of star athletes.

Team and individual success is closely scrutinized in this day and age. With that being said, there is a lot of pressure placed on athletes all over the world.

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The level of competition is rising at an exponential rate as is the media coverage. College graduates make more money. The average college graduate makes $, more than the average high school graduate over a lifetime. [] Career earnings for college graduates are 71% to % higher than those of high school graduates[] In , the average income for people 25 years old and older with a high school diploma was $35,, while the income for those with a bachelor's degree.

Jan 22,  · “From a business perspective,” he can see why Coach Meyer was hired, but he calls the package just more evidence that the “tail is wagging the dog.” College sports doesn’t just. Dec 18,  · “College sports will continue to be the most dynamic area of change in sports business, and it all won't be positive!” — John Rowady, President/Founder, rEvolution.

The negative aspects of college sports as a business

The Formula; where c is a specific team's total number of commits and R n is the Sports Composite Rating of the nth-best commit times ; Explanation; In order to create the most.

Jan 22,  · The rise of near-professional college sports has fueled the rise of near-professional fans. Mr. Carp, a freshman from Philadelphia sporting a .

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