Follow the thing papaya

Jutta Kister Fair Trade in Europe has become a fast growing market in recent decades.

Follow the thing papaya

This paper has been written to fit this bill. It outlines the findings of multi-locale ethnographic research into the globalization of food, focusing on a supply chain stretching from UK supermarket shelves to a Jamaican farm, and concluding in a North London flat.

The Idea … if we accept that geographical knowledges through which com- modity systems are imagined and acted upon from within are fragmentary, multiple, contradictory, inconsistent and, often, downright hypocritical, then the power of a text which deals with these knowledges comes not from smoothing them out, but through juxtaposing and montaging them … so that audiences can work their way through them and, along the way, inject and make their own critical knowledges out of them.

Cook and Crang Twisted off the stem. From fully green, to green with a yellow streak. Alongside a trailer, full of green plastic crates. Pulled by a tractor. And eight months old. And soon to be felled. But, picking is still going on there.

On a platform made from scaffolding. Welded to another trailer. Pulled slowly along by another tractor. Wheels following undulating tracks in the baked mud. Eight pickers leaning precariously off that platform.

Looking for those colour changes. Carefully twisting them off. Each a good handful. To the USA and Europe. Sold in mainstream supermarkets. InMina had been a speciality fruit and veg buyer for eight years. She worked at a supermarket HQ just outside London.

Most of this work revolved around her phone and computer. Keeping tabs on the market.

Follow the thing papaya

What crops had done well in which parts of the world. That month or week. And how this should influence their supply and price. All of her produce came via three big suppliers. Each supplier able to offer her a wide range of produce.

From huge volumes of mainstream fruits like pineapples, to dozens of boxes of obscure fruits like sapodillas. People in the trade expected papaya to go mainstream. Following kiwi fruits before them.

Broken into the market through promotions: But 99 p was good value. At what price and quality.A phrase taken from George Marcus who, apart from being the person who – for me at least – had coined the phrase ‘follow the thing’, was arguing that this imagination was necessary for the writing that would come out of the multi-site ethnographies that he .

You have free access to this content Antipode Volume 36, Issue 4, Version of Record online: 14 SEP Follow the Thing: Papaya Follow the Thing: Papaya Cook, Ian In a recent round table about Antipode's radical geographies, contributors argued that the journal needed more papers which stimulated debate, were accessible to academics and non‐academics alike, didn’t “preach to the cognoscenti”, were written to fit into radical teaching agendas, and were diverse and eclectic in style .

Papaya (paw paw) (grown in Jamaica, eaten in the UK) Academic journal paper (): geographer Ian Cook finds out where the fresh papaya sold in UK supermarkets are grown. He talks to a farm worker, foreman and manager in Jamaica, and an importer, supermarket buyer and consumer in the UK about their lives and how they are related .

Papaya (paw paw) (grown in Jamaica, eaten in the UK) Academic journal paper (): geographer Ian Cook finds out where the fresh papaya sold in UK supermarkets are grown.

He talks to a farm worker, foreman and manager in Jamaica, and an importer, supermarket buyer and consumer in the UK about their lives and how they are related . The main thing he had to figure out was if and how he might use Ananas to develop ‘a sort of cinematic imagination geared to writing’ (Marcus 45) (Source: Crang & Cook , p).

That papaya paper comes from my PhD, which was undertaken in the early s.

Follow the thing papaya
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